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Auktionsarchiv: Los-Nr. 1174

Exceptional Naval and Polar Awards from

Schätzpreis
18.000 £ - 22.000 £
ca. 27.135 $ - 33.166 $
Zuschlagspreis:
17.000 £
ca. 25.628 $
Auktionsarchiv: Los-Nr. 1174

Exceptional Naval and Polar Awards from

Schätzpreis
18.000 £ - 22.000 £
ca. 27.135 $ - 33.166 $
Zuschlagspreis:
17.000 £
ca. 25.628 $
Beschreibung:

Exceptional Naval and Polar Awards from the Collection of RC Witte The outstanding Great War Dogger Bank D.S.C. and Antarctic 1902-04 group of six awarded to Lieutenant-Commander F. E. Dailey, Royal Navy - a carpenter by trade, he assisted in the building and fitting out of the Discovery and lent valuable service in Scott’s first expedition, service duly recognised by the naming of Dailey Islands in McMurdo Sound: subsequently Chief Carpenter of the cruiser Lion for much of the Great War, he was present at Heligoland Bight, Dogger Bank and Jutland, the latter action resulting in him being awarded the Russian Order of St. Anne Medal of Distinction for Foreigners Distinguished Service Cross, G.V.R., hallmarks for London 1916, the reverse privately inscribed, ‘Chief Car. F. E. Dailey, “Dogger Bank”, H.M.S. Lion, 1915’; 1914-15 Star (Ch. Carpr. F. E. Dailey, D.S.C., R.N.); British War and Victory Medals (Cd. Shpt. F. E. Dailey, R.N.); Polar Medal 1904, E.VII.R., silver, 1 clasp, Antarctic 1902-04 (Carpenter F. E. Dailey, “Discovery”); Royal Geographical Society’s Silver Medal for Scott’s Antarctic Expedition 1902-04, the edge officially impressed, ‘F. E. Dailey, R.N.’, where applicable, mounted as worn, including the riband of the Russian Order of St. Anne Medal of Distinction for Foreigners, generally very fine and better (6) £18000-22000 Footnote Provenance: Christie’s, 17 November 1987 (Lot 71); see Lot 707 in this catalogue for the recipient’s Russian Order of St. Anne Medal of Distinction for Foreigners. D.S.C. London Gazette 3 March 1915. As per Admiral Beatty’s despatch for gallant services in the action off the Dogger Bank, dated 24 January 1915. Frederick Ernest Dailey was born in Portsmouth in 1873 and served his apprenticeship as a carpenter in Devonport Dockyard, following which, after ‘seven years of practical and theoretical shipbuilding’, he transferred to the Royal Navy and was serving in Ganges when recruited by a friend of Scott’s - a naval officer by the name of Arthur Ewart - for the Antarctic expedition. Scott wrote to Dailey from his residence in Chelsea in November 1900, confirming his appointment as Carpenter - ‘Before you go to Dundee, where the ship is building, I shall hope to see you in London and tell you more of our plans and your work.’ Scott’s first expedition Having duly assisted in the construction and fitting-out of the Discovery, Dailey was embarked for the journey South, a voyage during which he quickly made his mark with Scott, who wrote: ‘In his own department our carpenter, F. E. Dailey, worked with the same zealous care as the Boatswain. He possessed the same ‘eye’ for defects and the same determination that his charge should be beyond reproach.’ So, too, with the expedition’s Deputy Chief Scientist, George Murray F.R.S., who was compelled to return home once the Discovery reached South Africa. Immediately on his return to the U.K. he wrote to Dailey’s mother in the following terms: ‘I promised your son when I left the Discovery at Simon’s Bay to write and assure you of his good health and and excellent spirits. He was respected and trusted by all his officers and personally I found him most useful and obliging on the voyage out to the Cape. He is a man of such excellent character that I regard him as one of the mainstays of the Expedition.’ A mainstay indeed, for, as verified by numerous published sources, he went on to participate in a number of sledging trips, Dr. Wilson noting in his diary on Wednesday 24 September that Dailey, in company with Koettlitz and Bernacchi, ‘went off man-hauling a lightly loaded sledge towards the west to investigate the old penknife ice Royds had met with in his journey’, and similarly of their return nine days later - ‘They were pretty tired out, but very perky and pleased to get home again.’ Next employed in one of the teams supporting Scott’s ‘Southern Journey’, Dailey was out on the ice sledge-hauling from 2-12 November 1902, before turning back for Hut

Auktionsarchiv: Los-Nr. 1174
Auktion:
Datum:
25.03.2013 - 26.03.2013
Auktionshaus:
Dix Noonan Webb
16 Bolton St, Mayfair
London, W1J 8BQ
Großbritannien und Nordirland
[email protected]
+44 (0)20 7016 1700
+44 (0)20 7016 1799
Beschreibung:

Exceptional Naval and Polar Awards from the Collection of RC Witte The outstanding Great War Dogger Bank D.S.C. and Antarctic 1902-04 group of six awarded to Lieutenant-Commander F. E. Dailey, Royal Navy - a carpenter by trade, he assisted in the building and fitting out of the Discovery and lent valuable service in Scott’s first expedition, service duly recognised by the naming of Dailey Islands in McMurdo Sound: subsequently Chief Carpenter of the cruiser Lion for much of the Great War, he was present at Heligoland Bight, Dogger Bank and Jutland, the latter action resulting in him being awarded the Russian Order of St. Anne Medal of Distinction for Foreigners Distinguished Service Cross, G.V.R., hallmarks for London 1916, the reverse privately inscribed, ‘Chief Car. F. E. Dailey, “Dogger Bank”, H.M.S. Lion, 1915’; 1914-15 Star (Ch. Carpr. F. E. Dailey, D.S.C., R.N.); British War and Victory Medals (Cd. Shpt. F. E. Dailey, R.N.); Polar Medal 1904, E.VII.R., silver, 1 clasp, Antarctic 1902-04 (Carpenter F. E. Dailey, “Discovery”); Royal Geographical Society’s Silver Medal for Scott’s Antarctic Expedition 1902-04, the edge officially impressed, ‘F. E. Dailey, R.N.’, where applicable, mounted as worn, including the riband of the Russian Order of St. Anne Medal of Distinction for Foreigners, generally very fine and better (6) £18000-22000 Footnote Provenance: Christie’s, 17 November 1987 (Lot 71); see Lot 707 in this catalogue for the recipient’s Russian Order of St. Anne Medal of Distinction for Foreigners. D.S.C. London Gazette 3 March 1915. As per Admiral Beatty’s despatch for gallant services in the action off the Dogger Bank, dated 24 January 1915. Frederick Ernest Dailey was born in Portsmouth in 1873 and served his apprenticeship as a carpenter in Devonport Dockyard, following which, after ‘seven years of practical and theoretical shipbuilding’, he transferred to the Royal Navy and was serving in Ganges when recruited by a friend of Scott’s - a naval officer by the name of Arthur Ewart - for the Antarctic expedition. Scott wrote to Dailey from his residence in Chelsea in November 1900, confirming his appointment as Carpenter - ‘Before you go to Dundee, where the ship is building, I shall hope to see you in London and tell you more of our plans and your work.’ Scott’s first expedition Having duly assisted in the construction and fitting-out of the Discovery, Dailey was embarked for the journey South, a voyage during which he quickly made his mark with Scott, who wrote: ‘In his own department our carpenter, F. E. Dailey, worked with the same zealous care as the Boatswain. He possessed the same ‘eye’ for defects and the same determination that his charge should be beyond reproach.’ So, too, with the expedition’s Deputy Chief Scientist, George Murray F.R.S., who was compelled to return home once the Discovery reached South Africa. Immediately on his return to the U.K. he wrote to Dailey’s mother in the following terms: ‘I promised your son when I left the Discovery at Simon’s Bay to write and assure you of his good health and and excellent spirits. He was respected and trusted by all his officers and personally I found him most useful and obliging on the voyage out to the Cape. He is a man of such excellent character that I regard him as one of the mainstays of the Expedition.’ A mainstay indeed, for, as verified by numerous published sources, he went on to participate in a number of sledging trips, Dr. Wilson noting in his diary on Wednesday 24 September that Dailey, in company with Koettlitz and Bernacchi, ‘went off man-hauling a lightly loaded sledge towards the west to investigate the old penknife ice Royds had met with in his journey’, and similarly of their return nine days later - ‘They were pretty tired out, but very perky and pleased to get home again.’ Next employed in one of the teams supporting Scott’s ‘Southern Journey’, Dailey was out on the ice sledge-hauling from 2-12 November 1902, before turning back for Hut

Auktionsarchiv: Los-Nr. 1174
Auktion:
Datum:
25.03.2013 - 26.03.2013
Auktionshaus:
Dix Noonan Webb
16 Bolton St, Mayfair
London, W1J 8BQ
Großbritannien und Nordirland
[email protected]
+44 (0)20 7016 1700
+44 (0)20 7016 1799
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