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Auktionsarchiv: Los-Nr. 396

The Bill and Angela Strong Medal

Schätzpreis
5.000 £ - 6.000 £
ca. 8.171 $ - 9.806 $
Zuschlagspreis:
7.500 £
ca. 12.257 $
Auktionsarchiv: Los-Nr. 396

The Bill and Angela Strong Medal

Schätzpreis
5.000 £ - 6.000 £
ca. 8.171 $ - 9.806 $
Zuschlagspreis:
7.500 £
ca. 12.257 $
Beschreibung:

The Bill and Angela Strong Medal Collection An extremely rare Naval Long Service medal for Gallantry in the Crimea awarded to Private John McElroy Royal Marines, who was dangerously wounded at Inkermann and had his left arm amputated, one of only seven such awards for gallantry Royal Navy L.S. & G.C., V.R., wide suspension (John McElroy Pte. R.M. Woolh. Divn. Crimea) edge bruise and contact marks, otherwise nearly very fine £5000-6000 Footnote Ex Christie’s April 1984. One of only seven such awards for gallantry. Another example was sold in the Douglas-Morris Collection, D.N.W. October 1996. Private John McElroy 64th Coy Woolwich Division, Royal Marines, was one of seven N.C.0.s and Privates of the Royal Marines to receive a Naval Long Service and Good Conduct Medal, with gratuity, for Gallantry at the Battle of Inkermann, 5th November, 1854, where he was dangerously wounded by gunshot and his left arm subsequently amputated. The list includes Corporal John Pettyjohn, who also received the Victoria Cross, and it is thought that the ‘Long Service’ medals were awarded for the same action, in dispersing Russian sharpshooters from the caves at Inkermann. McElroy, who also received the Crimea medal with three clasps, Balaklava, Inkermann, and Sebastopol, was invalided from the service on 31 July 1855, after serving seven years, six months and was given a pension for life of £18.4.0 per annum. The historic value of this medal is compounded by the fact that coincidentally the only surviving Parish ‘Notification of Good Conduct’ is made out to Private John McElroy ‘to whom the Honorary Medal and a Gratuity of £5 has been presented for Gallant Conduct before the enemy’. The words ‘long service and good’ were struck out and ‘Gallant’ written in. These notices were posted in the honoured man’s parish, usually on the door of a church or chapel, or prominently displayed at a public meeting place. The distinguishing feature on each of the two extant Naval ‘Long Service’ medals for Gallantry is the word ‘Crimea’ inscribed on the edge of the medal, and although a more appropriate award would have been the new Medal for Distinguished Service in the field (D.C.M.), at no time did the Corps attempt to investigate the possibility of rewarding their men with it, indeed, the first D.C.M. to the Royal Marines was awarded for the Soudan in 1885. Further information relating to these rare medals can be found in Naval Medals 1793-1856 by Captain K. J. Douglas-Morris, R.N.

Auktionsarchiv: Los-Nr. 396
Auktion:
Datum:
18.05.2011
Auktionshaus:
Dix Noonan Webb
16 Bolton St, Mayfair
London, W1J 8BQ
Großbritannien und Nordirland
[email protected]
+44 (0)20 7016 1700
+44 (0)20 7016 1799
Beschreibung:

The Bill and Angela Strong Medal Collection An extremely rare Naval Long Service medal for Gallantry in the Crimea awarded to Private John McElroy Royal Marines, who was dangerously wounded at Inkermann and had his left arm amputated, one of only seven such awards for gallantry Royal Navy L.S. & G.C., V.R., wide suspension (John McElroy Pte. R.M. Woolh. Divn. Crimea) edge bruise and contact marks, otherwise nearly very fine £5000-6000 Footnote Ex Christie’s April 1984. One of only seven such awards for gallantry. Another example was sold in the Douglas-Morris Collection, D.N.W. October 1996. Private John McElroy 64th Coy Woolwich Division, Royal Marines, was one of seven N.C.0.s and Privates of the Royal Marines to receive a Naval Long Service and Good Conduct Medal, with gratuity, for Gallantry at the Battle of Inkermann, 5th November, 1854, where he was dangerously wounded by gunshot and his left arm subsequently amputated. The list includes Corporal John Pettyjohn, who also received the Victoria Cross, and it is thought that the ‘Long Service’ medals were awarded for the same action, in dispersing Russian sharpshooters from the caves at Inkermann. McElroy, who also received the Crimea medal with three clasps, Balaklava, Inkermann, and Sebastopol, was invalided from the service on 31 July 1855, after serving seven years, six months and was given a pension for life of £18.4.0 per annum. The historic value of this medal is compounded by the fact that coincidentally the only surviving Parish ‘Notification of Good Conduct’ is made out to Private John McElroy ‘to whom the Honorary Medal and a Gratuity of £5 has been presented for Gallant Conduct before the enemy’. The words ‘long service and good’ were struck out and ‘Gallant’ written in. These notices were posted in the honoured man’s parish, usually on the door of a church or chapel, or prominently displayed at a public meeting place. The distinguishing feature on each of the two extant Naval ‘Long Service’ medals for Gallantry is the word ‘Crimea’ inscribed on the edge of the medal, and although a more appropriate award would have been the new Medal for Distinguished Service in the field (D.C.M.), at no time did the Corps attempt to investigate the possibility of rewarding their men with it, indeed, the first D.C.M. to the Royal Marines was awarded for the Soudan in 1885. Further information relating to these rare medals can be found in Naval Medals 1793-1856 by Captain K. J. Douglas-Morris, R.N.

Auktionsarchiv: Los-Nr. 396
Auktion:
Datum:
18.05.2011
Auktionshaus:
Dix Noonan Webb
16 Bolton St, Mayfair
London, W1J 8BQ
Großbritannien und Nordirland
[email protected]
+44 (0)20 7016 1700
+44 (0)20 7016 1799
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