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Kathleen Fox (1880-1963) Ruins of the

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1.880 € - 1.963 €
ca. 2.466 $ - 2.575 $
Zuschlagspreis:
n. a.
Auktionsarchiv: Los-Nr. 57

Kathleen Fox (1880-1963) Ruins of the

Schätzpreis
1.880 € - 1.963 €
ca. 2.466 $ - 2.575 $
Zuschlagspreis:
n. a.
Beschreibung:

Kathleen Fox (1880-1963) Ruins of the Four Courts, (1922) Oil on canvas, 50.8 x 68.6cm (20 x 27'') Signed and dated 1922 Provenance: Purchased by the current owners' father from Leo Smith, The Dawson Gallery, Dublin 1943; and thence by descent Exhibited: 1923 RHA Annual Exhibition Cat. No. 243 priced �52.10.0 The Crawford Gallery, Cork, May - August 2006 ''Ireland: Her People and Landscape'' The AVA Gallery, June - Sept 2012, Cat. No. 14 Literature: ''Whipping the Herring'', published by The Crawford Gallery 2006. Full page illustration p209; ''One Hundred Years of Irish Art - A Millennium Presentation'' by Eamonn Mallie p222 Full page Illustration p223; ''Ireland: Her People and Landscape'' Exhibition Catalogue, full page illustration p21 Kathleen Fox was brought up in Anglo-Irish family on the outskirts of Dublin and studied at the Metropolitan School of Art, attracting the attention of William Orpen whose assistant she eventually became. She first exhibited with the Royal Hibernian Academy in 1911 before leaving to paint in Paris and Bruges, returning to Dublin in 1916. She moved to Nice at the end of the 1910's but continued to exhibit in London and Dublin as well as France, before returning to Dublin again in the mid 1920's. She was a highly successful portraitist in Ireland and England and well regarded for her flower studies of the 1940's and 50's. A more academic approach to realism was brought to Irish art through William Orpen's teaching at the Dublin Metropolitan School of Art from 1902-14. His former studio assistant, Kathleen Fox (1880-1963) painted Ruins of the Four Courts, (1922) which depicts the familiar building from an established viewpoint across the Liffey. What is striking about the work is that within the tranquil scene the dome of Gandon's great building is missing and next to it are the shells of buildings destroyed in the War of Independence. Fox's work belongs to an important strand of early 20th century realist art, one which sought to record the major events of Irish history. This paintings does so in a subtle but compelling manner. Dr. R�s�n Kennedy Kathleen Fox (1880-1963) Ruins of the Four Courts, (1922) Oil on canvas, 50.8 x 68.6cm (20 x 27'') Signed and dated 1922 Provenance: Purchased by the current owners' father from Leo Smith, The Dawson Gallery, Dublin 1943; and thence by descent Exhibited: 1923 RHA Annual Exhibition Cat. No. 243 priced �52.10.0 The Crawford Gallery, Cork, May - August 2006 ''Ireland: Her People and Landscape'' The AVA Gallery, June - Sept 2012, Cat. No. 14 Literature: ''Whipping the Herring'', published by The Crawford Gallery 2006. Full page illustration p209; ''One Hundred Years of Irish Art - A Millennium Presentation'' by Eamonn Mallie p222 Full page Illustration p223; ''Ireland: Her People and Landscape'' Exhibition Catalogue, full page illustration p21 Kathleen Fox was brought up in Anglo-Irish family on the outskirts of Dublin and studied at the Metropolitan School of Art, attracting the attention of William Orpen whose assistant she eventually became. She first exhibited with the Royal Hibernian Academy in 1911 before leaving to paint in Paris and Bruges, returning to Dublin in 1916. She moved to Nice at the end of the 1910's but continued to exhibit in London and Dublin as well as France, before returning to Dublin again in the mid 1920's. She was a highly successful portraitist in Ireland and England and well regarded for her flower studies of the 1940's and 50's. A more academic approach to realism was brought to Irish art through William Orpen's teaching at the Dublin Metropolitan School of Art from 1902-14. His former studio assistant, Kathleen Fox (1880-1963) painted Ruins of the Four Courts, (1922) which depicts the familiar building from an established viewpoint across the Liffey. What is striking about the work is that within the tranquil scene the dome of Gandon's great building is missing and next to it are the shells of buildings destroyed in the

Auktionsarchiv: Los-Nr. 57
Auktion:
Datum:
04.12.2012
Auktionshaus:
Adams's
St Stephens Green 26
D02 X665 Dublin 2
Irland
[email protected]
+353-1-6760261)
Beschreibung:

Kathleen Fox (1880-1963) Ruins of the Four Courts, (1922) Oil on canvas, 50.8 x 68.6cm (20 x 27'') Signed and dated 1922 Provenance: Purchased by the current owners' father from Leo Smith, The Dawson Gallery, Dublin 1943; and thence by descent Exhibited: 1923 RHA Annual Exhibition Cat. No. 243 priced �52.10.0 The Crawford Gallery, Cork, May - August 2006 ''Ireland: Her People and Landscape'' The AVA Gallery, June - Sept 2012, Cat. No. 14 Literature: ''Whipping the Herring'', published by The Crawford Gallery 2006. Full page illustration p209; ''One Hundred Years of Irish Art - A Millennium Presentation'' by Eamonn Mallie p222 Full page Illustration p223; ''Ireland: Her People and Landscape'' Exhibition Catalogue, full page illustration p21 Kathleen Fox was brought up in Anglo-Irish family on the outskirts of Dublin and studied at the Metropolitan School of Art, attracting the attention of William Orpen whose assistant she eventually became. She first exhibited with the Royal Hibernian Academy in 1911 before leaving to paint in Paris and Bruges, returning to Dublin in 1916. She moved to Nice at the end of the 1910's but continued to exhibit in London and Dublin as well as France, before returning to Dublin again in the mid 1920's. She was a highly successful portraitist in Ireland and England and well regarded for her flower studies of the 1940's and 50's. A more academic approach to realism was brought to Irish art through William Orpen's teaching at the Dublin Metropolitan School of Art from 1902-14. His former studio assistant, Kathleen Fox (1880-1963) painted Ruins of the Four Courts, (1922) which depicts the familiar building from an established viewpoint across the Liffey. What is striking about the work is that within the tranquil scene the dome of Gandon's great building is missing and next to it are the shells of buildings destroyed in the War of Independence. Fox's work belongs to an important strand of early 20th century realist art, one which sought to record the major events of Irish history. This paintings does so in a subtle but compelling manner. Dr. R�s�n Kennedy Kathleen Fox (1880-1963) Ruins of the Four Courts, (1922) Oil on canvas, 50.8 x 68.6cm (20 x 27'') Signed and dated 1922 Provenance: Purchased by the current owners' father from Leo Smith, The Dawson Gallery, Dublin 1943; and thence by descent Exhibited: 1923 RHA Annual Exhibition Cat. No. 243 priced �52.10.0 The Crawford Gallery, Cork, May - August 2006 ''Ireland: Her People and Landscape'' The AVA Gallery, June - Sept 2012, Cat. No. 14 Literature: ''Whipping the Herring'', published by The Crawford Gallery 2006. Full page illustration p209; ''One Hundred Years of Irish Art - A Millennium Presentation'' by Eamonn Mallie p222 Full page Illustration p223; ''Ireland: Her People and Landscape'' Exhibition Catalogue, full page illustration p21 Kathleen Fox was brought up in Anglo-Irish family on the outskirts of Dublin and studied at the Metropolitan School of Art, attracting the attention of William Orpen whose assistant she eventually became. She first exhibited with the Royal Hibernian Academy in 1911 before leaving to paint in Paris and Bruges, returning to Dublin in 1916. She moved to Nice at the end of the 1910's but continued to exhibit in London and Dublin as well as France, before returning to Dublin again in the mid 1920's. She was a highly successful portraitist in Ireland and England and well regarded for her flower studies of the 1940's and 50's. A more academic approach to realism was brought to Irish art through William Orpen's teaching at the Dublin Metropolitan School of Art from 1902-14. His former studio assistant, Kathleen Fox (1880-1963) painted Ruins of the Four Courts, (1922) which depicts the familiar building from an established viewpoint across the Liffey. What is striking about the work is that within the tranquil scene the dome of Gandon's great building is missing and next to it are the shells of buildings destroyed in the

Auktionsarchiv: Los-Nr. 57
Auktion:
Datum:
04.12.2012
Auktionshaus:
Adams's
St Stephens Green 26
D02 X665 Dublin 2
Irland
[email protected]
+353-1-6760261)
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