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Auktion: Books & Manuscripts
wurde versteigert am: 15. November 2011
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JEFFERSON, Thomas Autograph letter signed ("Th:Jefferson") t...

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JEFFERSON, Thomas. Autograph letter signed ("Th:Jefferson") to the Philadelphia publisher Matthew Carey (1760-1839), Monticello, 27 January 1812. 1 page, 4to, docketed by recipient at top right corner, one corner neatly mended, ink slightly pale . Housed in a custom-made protective case with the following manuscript leaves.
JEFFERSON, Thomas. Autograph letter signed ("Th:Jefferson") to the Philadelphia publisher Matthew Carey (1760-1839), Monticello, 27 January 1812. 1 page, 4to, docketed by recipient at top right corner, one corner neatly mended, ink slightly pale . Housed in a custom-made protective case with the following manuscript leaves. THE RETIRED PRESIDENT WAIVES THE COPYRIGHT ON HIS "MANUAL OF PARLIMENTARY PROCEDURE". Jefferson responds to a request from Carey concerning Jefferson's copyright and the possibility of a new edition of his Manual of Parliamentary Procedure. No copyright agreement is necessary, he explains, as the work is in the public domain: "The Parliamentary Manual, originally composed for my personal use, was printed on the supposition that it might be of use to others, and have some tendency to settle the rules of proceeding in Congress, where, in the lower house especially they had got into forms totally unfriendly to a fair extrication of the will of the majority. No right [copyright] over it was therefore wished to be retained by myself, nor given to others. Its reimpression consequently is open to every one, nor have I any thing to add to it but what is contained in the enclosed amendments which should be incorporated with the text of the original in their proper places. I believe that Mr. Milligan of Georgetown is now engaged in printing an 8vo edition. Almost the essence of its value is its being accommodated to pocket use. Accept the assurance of my esteem and respect...." In the end, Carey evidently dropped the idea of a new edition, perhaps because, as Jefferson indicates, the edition of Georgetown printer Milligan was already underway; it was published in early 1813. This letter is cited in Papers , Second Series, Jefferson's Parliamenary Writings , ed. W.S. Howell, p. 33 and notes. [ WITH ]: JEFFERSON. Autograph manuscript, comprising five pages from the original manuscript of his Manual of Parliamentary Procedure , probably drafted in the Summer of 1800, as Jefferson prepared to have it printed for the use of Congress. Written in Jefferson's minute handwriting, sections numbered in Roman numerals. A working manuscript, with numerous cross-outs, many additions in margins, others interlinear, containing roughly 2,500 words. 5 pages on four sheets; 4 pages on 2 sheets 7 1/8 x 4½ in. (180 x 115mm.); 1 page on a small slip 2 5/8 x 3 5/8 in. (62 x 90mm) . Perhaps originally attached with red wax wafers to a larger sheet, now neatly detached. Light age-toning, one or two corners nicked , otherwise in excellent condition. Each leaf double-patted between plexi-glass panels. JEFFERSON'S "MANUAL OF PARLIAMENTARY PROCEDURE," COMPILED FOR THE U.S. SENATE IN 1801 AND STILL IN USE BY THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES A significant portion of the original manuscript of one of Jefferson's most significant and influential works, and one of only three books he published in his lifetime (others are Notes on Virginia and a legal account of the dispute over the batture of New Oreans). Jefferson's Manual of Parliamentary Procedure , still in daily use in the House of Representatives, was the fruit of many years legislative experience and careful notes taken in some 40 years study. It comprisees an extensive digest of English parliamentary legal practice, and incorporates procedures of the U.S. Senate under the U.S. Constitution. In 53 sections, the Manual specifies rules and procedures for elections, verifying the credentials of members, the call of the house, absence, the speaker, committees, petitions, motions, resolutions, 1st, 2nd and final reading of bills, amendments, privileged questions, messages, adjournment, treaties and, at the end, impeachment proceedings. Jefferson was uniquely qualified to undertake such a demanding and meticulous a task. He had read law with George Wythe at William and Mary, then "between 1769 and 1779 Jefferson served successively in the Virginia House of Burgesses, the Continental Congress, and

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Auktionshaus: Christie's
Titel: Books & Manuscripts
Auktionsdatum: 15.11.2011
Adresse: Christie's
15 November 2011, New York, Rockefeller Center