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DARWIN, Charles Robert (1809-1882)

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Zuschlagspreis:
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Auktionsarchiv: Los-Nr. 109

DARWIN, Charles Robert (1809-1882)

Schätzpreis
25.000 £ - 35.000 £
ca. 33.180 $ - 46.453 $
Zuschlagspreis:
n. a.
Beschreibung:

DARWIN, Charles Robert (1809-1882) The Descent of Man, and selection in relation to sex. London: John Murray 1871. First edition, first issue, of the first of Darwin's works to use the word 'evolution'; a presentation copy to his close associate Henry Walter Bates, whom Darwin tasked with proof-reading the entomological section of the present work. The word 'evolution' appears on p.2 of the first volume, 'that is to say before its appearance in the sixth edition of the Origin of species in the following year' (Freeman p 129). 'In the Origin Darwin had avoided discussing the place occupied by Homo sapiens in the scheme of natural selection … Twelve years later he made good his promise with The descent of man, in which he compared man's physical and psychological characteristics to similar traits in apes and other animals, showing how even man's mind and moral sense could have developed through evolutionary processes' (Norman). Henry Walter Bates (1825-1892) was an entomologist, travelling companion of Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913), and the first person to give a scientific account of mimicry in animals. Bates befriended Wallace when the latter took a teaching post in the Leicester Collegiate School in 1844, both sharing a passion for entomology. In 1848, they sailed to Brazil, endeavouring to explore the Amazon rainforest, make their names in natural history circles, and self-finance the expedition by selling their duplicate natural history specimens back in London. This didn't quite go according to plan: en route back to London in 1852, Wallace's ship caught fire, and all their specimens were lost. However, Bates remained in the Amazon until 1859, continuing to explore, collect specimens and make field observations. Upon his return to England, Bates found that he was unprepared for the reality of London life, and it was Darwin who offered him practical help by securing Bates a curator's job at the British Museum. Bates repaid Darwin with his demonstration of the operation of natural selection in animal mimicry (the imitation by a species of other life forms or inanimate objects). 'Bates proposed that mimicry functioned as a life-saving disguise. One insect might be unpalatable to birds. If another species came to imitate it, it too would benefit from not being eaten … Bates explained to Darwin how this protective mimicry must emerge through adaptation and selection. By eating some insects and not others, birds were naturally selecting the forms and colourings that would survive. The better the mimic, the better the survival rate’ (Janet Browne, Charles Darwin II, pp.224-225). Darwin was so impressed by Bates’ work, that he not only reviewed it himself in Natural History Review (1863), but asked Bates to proof-read the entomological section of Descent (I, pp.341–423). Bates returned the corrected proofs on 17 January 1870 (DCP-LETT-7082), from which Darwin included Bates’ information about sexual difference in colours in Prionidae (Descent I, 367-8). This letter also reveals the arguments Wallace and Darwin were having over the relative influence of protection and sexual selection in determining colour differences between the sexes of various organisms (see DCP-LETT-5416, letter from Wallace, 24 February [1867]), and which Darwin discusses – disagreeing with Wallace – in the current work (I, p.405). Although Wallace and Darwin corresponded directly with one another, extant letters show that Darwin sometimes preferred to use Bates as a go-between himself and Wallace: correspondence between Bates and Darwin (DCP-LETT-9144) clearly shows that in 1873 Darwin had asked Bates to write to Wallace to enquire whether the latter was willing to revise The Descent of Man for a second edition. Freeman 937; Garrison and Morton 170; Norman 599. 2 vols, octavo (185 x 120 mm, edges trimmed for presentation). Half-titles, numerous illustrations in text, 16pp. ads at end of both vols dated January 1871 (occasional faint creasefolds to corner

Auktionsarchiv: Los-Nr. 109
Auktion:
Datum:
15.12.2021
Auktionshaus:
Christie's
King Street, St. James's 8
London, SW1Y 6QT
Großbritannien und Nordirland
+44 (0)20 7839 9060
+44 (0)20 73892869
Beschreibung:

DARWIN, Charles Robert (1809-1882) The Descent of Man, and selection in relation to sex. London: John Murray 1871. First edition, first issue, of the first of Darwin's works to use the word 'evolution'; a presentation copy to his close associate Henry Walter Bates, whom Darwin tasked with proof-reading the entomological section of the present work. The word 'evolution' appears on p.2 of the first volume, 'that is to say before its appearance in the sixth edition of the Origin of species in the following year' (Freeman p 129). 'In the Origin Darwin had avoided discussing the place occupied by Homo sapiens in the scheme of natural selection … Twelve years later he made good his promise with The descent of man, in which he compared man's physical and psychological characteristics to similar traits in apes and other animals, showing how even man's mind and moral sense could have developed through evolutionary processes' (Norman). Henry Walter Bates (1825-1892) was an entomologist, travelling companion of Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913), and the first person to give a scientific account of mimicry in animals. Bates befriended Wallace when the latter took a teaching post in the Leicester Collegiate School in 1844, both sharing a passion for entomology. In 1848, they sailed to Brazil, endeavouring to explore the Amazon rainforest, make their names in natural history circles, and self-finance the expedition by selling their duplicate natural history specimens back in London. This didn't quite go according to plan: en route back to London in 1852, Wallace's ship caught fire, and all their specimens were lost. However, Bates remained in the Amazon until 1859, continuing to explore, collect specimens and make field observations. Upon his return to England, Bates found that he was unprepared for the reality of London life, and it was Darwin who offered him practical help by securing Bates a curator's job at the British Museum. Bates repaid Darwin with his demonstration of the operation of natural selection in animal mimicry (the imitation by a species of other life forms or inanimate objects). 'Bates proposed that mimicry functioned as a life-saving disguise. One insect might be unpalatable to birds. If another species came to imitate it, it too would benefit from not being eaten … Bates explained to Darwin how this protective mimicry must emerge through adaptation and selection. By eating some insects and not others, birds were naturally selecting the forms and colourings that would survive. The better the mimic, the better the survival rate’ (Janet Browne, Charles Darwin II, pp.224-225). Darwin was so impressed by Bates’ work, that he not only reviewed it himself in Natural History Review (1863), but asked Bates to proof-read the entomological section of Descent (I, pp.341–423). Bates returned the corrected proofs on 17 January 1870 (DCP-LETT-7082), from which Darwin included Bates’ information about sexual difference in colours in Prionidae (Descent I, 367-8). This letter also reveals the arguments Wallace and Darwin were having over the relative influence of protection and sexual selection in determining colour differences between the sexes of various organisms (see DCP-LETT-5416, letter from Wallace, 24 February [1867]), and which Darwin discusses – disagreeing with Wallace – in the current work (I, p.405). Although Wallace and Darwin corresponded directly with one another, extant letters show that Darwin sometimes preferred to use Bates as a go-between himself and Wallace: correspondence between Bates and Darwin (DCP-LETT-9144) clearly shows that in 1873 Darwin had asked Bates to write to Wallace to enquire whether the latter was willing to revise The Descent of Man for a second edition. Freeman 937; Garrison and Morton 170; Norman 599. 2 vols, octavo (185 x 120 mm, edges trimmed for presentation). Half-titles, numerous illustrations in text, 16pp. ads at end of both vols dated January 1871 (occasional faint creasefolds to corner

Auktionsarchiv: Los-Nr. 109
Auktion:
Datum:
15.12.2021
Auktionshaus:
Christie's
King Street, St. James's 8
London, SW1Y 6QT
Großbritannien und Nordirland
+44 (0)20 7839 9060
+44 (0)20 73892869
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