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Auktion: Books & Manuscripts
wurde versteigert am: 15. November 2011
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CHURCHILL, Winston S Printed Address, To the Electors of Dun...

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CHURCHILL, Winston S. Printed Address, To the Electors of Dundee, 28 December 1909, Board of Trade, Whitehall Gardens, London, 28 December 1909. Dundee: John Leng & Co., [1909].
CHURCHILL, Winston S. Printed Address, To the Electors of Dundee, 28 December 1909, Board of Trade, Whitehall Gardens, London, 28 December 1909. Dundee: John Leng & Co., [1909]. 4 o , 4pp. (first and fourth pages age-toned and foxed, closed tear at right margin). [ With :] CHURCHILL. Printed Address, To the Electors of Dundee, 23 November 1910. Dundee: John Leng & Co. [1910]. 4 o , 2pp. (closed tear along right margin, edges worn). "THE TIME HAS COME TO DEAL WITH THE HOUSE OF LORDS" CHURCHILL INVOKES LINCOLN'S WORDS in his election addresses on the momentous constitutional battle between the House of Commons and the House of Lords. In November 1909, the Lords rejected the "People's Budget" of 1909 proposed by Liberal Prime Minister Herbert Asquith. The bill called for higher taxes on the wealthy to pay for a limited scheme of unemployment and worker's health insurance. The bill, and the intransigence of the House of Lords, became the central issue in two general elections held in 1910, the first in January the second in December. In the first address, Churchill decries the Lords' veto, saying "The people can be trusted. They are of age...If at one end of our political system we have a hereditary House of Landlords and great capitalists, wielding an absolute veto over legislation and finance...[then] government of the people, by the people, for the people will have become a nineteenth century daydream." The January 1910 election resulted in the Liberals forming a coalition government dependent upon their Labour Party and Irish Nationalist allies. The Lords approved a slightly modified version of the People's Budget in April 1910, but the Liberals were determined to strike down the veto power of the upper chamber, and made it the issue of a second general election, in December 1910. In his second address (November 1910), Churchill is more combative and impatient. "No one can persuade the Tory Party to give up their Veto. They regard themselves as the ruling caste...They treat us as if we were a conquered race...They cannot bring themselves...to part from that unfair Veto... You will have to take it from them. You will have to take it from them now. You will have to take it from them for ever. One good wrench, and out it comes!" The growing political unrest in the country forced the Lords to yield. They consented to the Parliament Act of 1911, which significantly reduced their powers (a Commons bill passed by successive Parliaments over two years would become law in spite of a Lords veto). Woods A15/1. (2)

Informationen zur Auktion
Auktionshaus: Christie's
Titel: Books & Manuscripts
Auktionsdatum: 15.11.2011
Adresse: Christie's
15 November 2011, New York, Rockefeller Center