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Auktion: Valuable Manuscripts and Printed Books
wurde versteigert am: 4. Juni 2008
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CHURCHILL, Sir Winston Spencer (1874-1965) Typescript with c...

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Schätzpreis: 100.000 £ - 150.000 £
ca. 196.491 $ - 294.736 $
Zuschlagspreis:  139.250 £
ca. 273.613 $
Los-Nr. 97, Aufrufe: 45

CHURCHILL, Sir Winston Spencer (1874-1965). Typescript with copious autograph emendations of his famous speech in the House of Commons on the war situation during the Battle of Britain (KNOWN AS 'THE FEW'), [Chequers/London, 18/19 August 1940], the emendations in red and (subsequently) black ink to every page, comprising MORE THAN 250 WORDS IN CHURCHILL'S HAND, including extensive cancellations and a number of abandoned variants, 9 pages, 4to (approx 240 x 190mm) , intermittently numbered in typescript ('2', '3') and pencil ('C.', 'C.1', 'C.2'), on paper with embossed letter head 'G.R.' to upper left corner (red ink faint but legible on later pages, punch holes to upper left filled in, some discolouration to margins), mounted, framed and glazed. Provenance : Sir John Colville (1915-1987, Churchill's Assistant Private Secretary 1940-41), and by descent (Colville's autograph note to label on verso of frame); on loan at Chequers, the official country residence of British Prime Ministers, at which Churchill wrote much of the speech, between 1982 and 2007. CHURCHILL IN THE MIDST OF THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN: THE ONLY SURVIVING DRAFT OF ONE OF THE GREAT SPEECHES OF THE 20TH CENTURY 'Almost a year has passed since the war began ... ': Churchill's magisterial summary of the war situation in the darkest hours of the Battle of Britain. Churchill begins with a comparison of the first year of the war against Nazi Germany with the first year of the Great War ('It is natural for us therefore to pause on our journey at this milestone, and survey the dark, wide field'), comparing the greater loss of life in the earlier war with the incomparably more dramatic events at the outset of the second war: 'We have seen great countries with powerful armies dashed out of coherent existence in a few weeks. We have seen the French Republic and the glorious French Army beaten into complete and total submission ... Although up to the present the loss of life has been mercifully diminished, the decisions reached in the course of the struggle are even more profound upon the fate of nations than anything which has ever happened since barbaric times ... a fearful game of chess proceeds from check to mate by which the unhappy players seem to be inexorably bound'. At the same time, the civilian populations are on this occasion fully implicated: 'not only soldiers, but the entire population, men women and children. The fronts are everywhere. The trenches are dug in the towns & cities. Every village is fortified. Every road is barred. The front line runs through the factories'. The draft omits the paragraphs present in the final version which deal with the blockade of continental Europe, and reopens with a consideration of the changing situation in the quarter of a year since his government took power, considering first the 'cataract of disaster' of those months, with the fall of Holland, Belgium and France, the near loss of the British Expeditionary Force and the establishing of the Luftwaffe 'so close to our Island that ... the hostile bombers not only reach our shores in a few minutes, and from many directions, but can be escorted by the Fighters'. But, in a movement typical of Churchill, this consideration of all that threatens Britain becomes a stimulus to pride, that 'at the end the end of such a period of terror and disaster, we should stand erect, sure of ourselves, masters of our fate, and with the conviction of final victory burning unquenchable in our hearts'. Churchill's situation review concludes with a consideration of the factors in favour of Britain, not only in terms of morale ('Our people are united and resolved as they have never been before'), but in military preparation, not least thanks to support from the United States: 'We have rearmed and rebuilt our Armies, in a degree which would have been deemed impossible a few months ago. We have ferried across the Atlantic, thanks to our friends over there, an immense mass of munitions of all kinds .
CHURCHILL, Sir Winston Spencer (1874-1965). Typescript with copious autograph emendations of his famous speech in the House of Commons on the war situation during the Battle of Britain (KNOWN AS 'THE FEW'), [Chequers/London, 18/19 August 1940], the emendations in red and (subsequently) black ink to every page, comprising MORE THAN 250 WORDS IN CHURCHILL'S HAND, including extensive cancellations and a number of abandoned variants, 9 pages, 4to (approx 240 x 190mm) , intermittently numbered in typescript ('2', '3') and pencil ('C.', 'C.1', 'C.2'), on paper with embossed letter head 'G.R.' to upper left corner (red ink faint but legible on later pages, punch holes to upper left filled in, some discolouration to margins), mounted, framed and glazed. Provenance : Sir John Colville (1915-1987, Churchill's Assistant Private Secretary 1940-41), and by descent (Colville's autograph note to label on verso of frame); on loan at Chequers, the official country residence of British Prime Ministers, at which Churchill wrote much of the speech, between 1982 and 2007. CHURCHILL IN THE MIDST OF THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN: THE ONLY SURVIVING DRAFT OF ONE OF THE GREAT SPEECHES OF THE 20TH CENTURY 'Almost a year has passed since the war began ... ': Churchill's magisterial summary of the war situation in the darkest hours of the Battle of Britain. Churchill begins with a comparison of the first year of the war against Nazi Germany with the first year of the Great War ('It is natural for us therefore to pause on our journey at this milestone, and survey the dark, wide field'), comparing the greater loss of life in the earlier war with the incomparably more dramatic events at the outset of the second war: 'We have seen great countries with powerful armies dashed out of coherent existence in a few weeks. We have seen the French Republic and the glorious French Army beaten into complete and total submission ... Although up to the present the loss of life has been mercifully diminished, the decisions reached in the course of the struggle are even more profound upon the fate of nations than anything which has ever happened since barbaric times ... a fearful game of chess proceeds from check to mate by which the unhappy players seem to be inexorably bound'. At the same time, the civilian populations are on this occasion fully implicated: 'not only soldiers, but the entire population, men women and children. The fronts are everywhere. The trenches are dug in the towns & cities. Every village is fortified. Every road is barred. The front line runs through the factories'. The draft omits the paragraphs present in the final version which deal with the blockade of continental Europe, and reopens with a consideration of the changing situation in the quarter of a year since his government took power, considering first the 'cataract of disaster' of those months, with the fall of Holland, Belgium and France, the near loss of the British Expeditionary Force and the establishing of the Luftwaffe 'so close to our Island that ... the hostile bombers not only reach our shores in a few minutes, and from many directions, but can be escorted by the Fighters'. But, in a movement typical of Churchill, this consideration of all that threatens Britain becomes a stimulus to pride, that 'at the end the end of such a period of terror and disaster, we should stand erect, sure of ourselves, masters of our fate, and with the conviction of final victory burning unquenchable in our hearts'. Churchill's situation review concludes with a consideration of the factors in favour of Britain, not only in terms of morale ('Our people are united and resolved as they have never been before'), but in military preparation, not least thanks to support from the United States: 'We have rearmed and rebuilt our Armies, in a degree which would have been deemed impossible a few months ago. We have ferried across the Atlantic, thanks to our friends over there, an immense mass of munitions of all kinds .

Informationen zur Auktion
Auktionshaus: Christie's
Titel: Valuable Manuscripts and Printed Books
Auktionsdatum: 04.06.2008
Adresse: Christie's
4 June 2008, London, King Street