Premium-Seiten ohne Registrierung:

Auktionsarchiv: Los-Nr. 406

Charles M. Bell Photograph of Apache Delegation with Agent John P. Clum, Ca 1876

Schätzpreis
3.000 $ - 5.000 $
Zuschlagspreis:
3.375 $
Auktionsarchiv: Los-Nr. 406

Charles M. Bell Photograph of Apache Delegation with Agent John P. Clum, Ca 1876

Schätzpreis
3.000 $ - 5.000 $
Zuschlagspreis:
3.375 $
Beschreibung:

Albumen photograph, 16.25 x 19 in., on 17 x 20 in. mount. Apache Delegation. Taken in Washington, DC by Charles M. Bell, ca 1876. Indian Agent John P. Clum is seated near the center, within a large group of Apache Indians, including a woman and two young boys. A white man stands in the back row, possibly another agent or interpreter, and a young white boy is seated in the front boy. Taza, the son of Cochise, who is not pictured, died during this trip to Washington. New York native John P. Clum (1851-1932) was inducted into the Army Signal Corps as an Observer Sergeant, and shortly after sent to Santa Fe, NM. The following year, the San Carlos Apache Reservation was formed. Because of other abuses in the Department of Indian Affairs, the Dutch Reformed Church was put in charge of the new agency, and in seeking someone to administer the agency, the church connected with Clum. He became the Indian Agent in 1874. He inherited the usual toxic political situation of civilian and military agencies competing for federal funds, little of which made it to the Indians. Plus typical abuse of the people, often at the hands of the military that was supposed to protect them. At San Carlos, Clum established a tribal police and court system, and instituted other self-rule measures. Although he faced a lack of support from the government, other agencies were closed, and their residents moved to San Carlos. Typically, little attention was given to the "compatibility" of such mergers. There was friction among a number of the Apache bands forced together at San Carlos. The situation became intolerable for Clum, and after only three years he resigned from his post. He went on to serve as the first Mayor of Tombstone as well as the founder of the Tombstone Epitaph, Arizona's oldest continually published newspaper. Provenance:American Indian Photography Collection of John W. Painter (1929-2008) Condition: Toning to print, including slightly darker area of toning near top left corner. Puncture in print near top right corner. Mount appears to have been previously trimmed.

Auktionsarchiv: Los-Nr. 406
Auktion:
Datum:
15.11.2019
Auktionshaus:
Cowan's Auctions, Inc.
Este Ave 6270
Cincinnati OH 45232
Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika
info@cowans.com
+1 (0)513 8711670
+1 (0)513 8718670
Beschreibung:

Albumen photograph, 16.25 x 19 in., on 17 x 20 in. mount. Apache Delegation. Taken in Washington, DC by Charles M. Bell, ca 1876. Indian Agent John P. Clum is seated near the center, within a large group of Apache Indians, including a woman and two young boys. A white man stands in the back row, possibly another agent or interpreter, and a young white boy is seated in the front boy. Taza, the son of Cochise, who is not pictured, died during this trip to Washington. New York native John P. Clum (1851-1932) was inducted into the Army Signal Corps as an Observer Sergeant, and shortly after sent to Santa Fe, NM. The following year, the San Carlos Apache Reservation was formed. Because of other abuses in the Department of Indian Affairs, the Dutch Reformed Church was put in charge of the new agency, and in seeking someone to administer the agency, the church connected with Clum. He became the Indian Agent in 1874. He inherited the usual toxic political situation of civilian and military agencies competing for federal funds, little of which made it to the Indians. Plus typical abuse of the people, often at the hands of the military that was supposed to protect them. At San Carlos, Clum established a tribal police and court system, and instituted other self-rule measures. Although he faced a lack of support from the government, other agencies were closed, and their residents moved to San Carlos. Typically, little attention was given to the "compatibility" of such mergers. There was friction among a number of the Apache bands forced together at San Carlos. The situation became intolerable for Clum, and after only three years he resigned from his post. He went on to serve as the first Mayor of Tombstone as well as the founder of the Tombstone Epitaph, Arizona's oldest continually published newspaper. Provenance:American Indian Photography Collection of John W. Painter (1929-2008) Condition: Toning to print, including slightly darker area of toning near top left corner. Puncture in print near top right corner. Mount appears to have been previously trimmed.

Auktionsarchiv: Los-Nr. 406
Auktion:
Datum:
15.11.2019
Auktionshaus:
Cowan's Auctions, Inc.
Este Ave 6270
Cincinnati OH 45232
Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika
info@cowans.com
+1 (0)513 8711670
+1 (0)513 8718670
LotSearch ausprobieren

Testen Sie LotSearch und seine Premium-Features 7 Tage - ohne Kosten!

  • Auktionssuche und Bieten
  • Preisdatenbank und Analysen
  • Individuelle automatische Suchaufträge
Jetzt einen Suchauftrag anlegen!

Lassen Sie sich automatisch über neue Objekte in kommenden Auktionen benachrichtigen.

Suchauftrag anlegen